Short Courses: 8-9 October 2022

Introduction to Rheology (a one-day short course)

October 8, 2022 (Saturday)

Rheology of Colloidal Glasses and Gels (a one-day short course)

October 9, 2022 (Sunday)

Rheology in Additive Manufacturing (a one-day short course)

October 9, 2022 (Sunday)

Participants have the option of taking a two-day short-course bundle at discounted costs.

All classes will begin at 8:30 am in Sheraton Grand Chicago.

The short courses are held in conjunction with the 93rd Annual Meeting of The Society of Rheology (October 9-13, 2021). Check out the lodging information page.

In addition to in-person participations of the short courses, we are also offering online participations. The online participants will access live streaming of the real-time lectures synchronously.

Register
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Short Course Registration Info

Short course registration includes a complete set of course notes. Payment can be made on line with MasterCard, Visa, or American Express. Lunch and snacks for the breaks will be provided each day for in-person participants.

One-Day Short Courses
  • Introduction to Rheology (Sat Oct 8)
  • Rheology of Colloidal Glasses and Gels (Sun Oct 9)
  • Rheology in Additive Manufacturing (Sun Oct 9)
Registration Fees for a One-Day Short Course Through 9/9/2022 After 9/9/2022***
In Person Online In Person Online
Member* $800 $640 $900 $740
Non-Member** (includes membership for 2023) $950 $760 $1,050 $860
Student Member* $350 $280 $450 $380
Student Non-Member** (includes membership for 2023) $400 $320 $500 $420
Retired Member $350 $280 $450 $380
Two-Day Short Course Bundles
  • Introduction to Rheology + Rheology of Colloidal Glasses and Gels (Sat Oct 8 – Sun Oct 9)
  • Introduction to Rheology + Rheology in Additive Manufacturing (Sat Oct 8 – Sun Oct 9)
Registration Fees for a Two-Day Short Course Bundle Through 9/9/2022 After 9/9/2022***
In Person Online In Person Online
Member* $1,200 $960 $1,300 $1,060
Non-Member** (includes membership for 2023) $1,425 $1,140 $1,525 $1,240
Student Member* $525 $420 $625 $520
Student Non-Member** (includes membership for 2023) $600 $480 $700 $580
Retired Member $525 $420 $625 $520

* Member rates are also available to non-members who are registered to attend the 93rd Annual Meeting in the same registration order.

** Non-members who are registered to attend the 93rd Annual Meeting may register for the short course at the member rates in the same registration order.

*** Registrations for in-person and online participations will close after Friday 30 September 2022.

Cancellations for the short course received by email (c/o The Local Arrangements Chair, Simon Rogers) by Friday 9 September 2022 will be refunded minus a $50 administrative charge. No refunds will be granted after that date.

Introduction to Rheology

George Petekidis, Materials Science and Technology, University of Crete and FORTH

Norman J. Wagner, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Delaware

Course Description

Available soon.

Course Outline
  • Rheological Concepts and Rheological Phenomena (1.5 hr)
  • Overview of rheological phenomena. Kinematics of shear flows. Basic rheological concepts. Simple constitutive models.
  • Intro to Polymer and Polymer Solutions Rheology Basics (1.5 hr)
  • Polymer science basics. Rheological phenomena associated with elasticity. Reptation. Generalized Newtonian & Maxwell models. Time-Temperature Superposition.
  • Intro to Colloids and Basics of Colloidal Suspension Rheology (1.5 hr)
  • Basics of colloidal systems. Definitions and illustrations of behavior and property connections, hard sphere dispersions.
  • Rheological Measurements (1.5 hr)
  • Rheometer basics - Rheological tooling, what, when, where and why? - Measurement strategies - Problems & mistakes!
  • Discussion of Student Questions (30 min)
Instructors
Photo of George Petekidis
George Petekidis

University of Crete and FORTH

George Petekidis received his Bachelor’s degree in Physics from the Aristotelian University of Thessaloniki and a Master’s and PhD degree in polymer physics from the Department of Physics of the University of Crete working on the “Dynamics of Hairy-rod polymers”. He worked at the Department of Physics and Astronomy of the University of Edinburgh with an individual Marie-Curie fellowship with Prof. P.N. Pusey on the “Dynamics of colloidal glasses under shear”. In 2002 he joined FORTH with a return Marie-Curie fellowship and subsequently as an Assistant Researcher. In 2006 he joined the Department of Materials Science and Technology of University of Crete where he is currently a Full Professor. He has served as Head of the Department (2013-2016) and president of the Hellenic Society of Rheology (2014-2017). In 2016 he received the Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel Research Award of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.

His research interests lie in the area of Experimental Soft Condensed Matter. Current work focuses on the dynamics and rheology of metastable colloidal systems such as colloidal glasses and gels, utilizing a combination of experimental tools (rheometry, scattering and microscopy) and computer simulations. More information about his publications and research activity can be found at University of Crete and FORTH.

Photo of Norman J. Wagner
Norman J. Wagner

University of Delaware

Norman J. Wagner is an Alison Professor of the University of Delaware and holds the distinguished Unidel Robert L. Pigford Chair in Chemical Engineering, with affiliated faculty appointments in Physics and Astronomy, Biomechanics and Movement Science, and Biomedical Engineering. He leads an interdisciplinary research team at the University of Delaware. He was President of The Society of Rheology (American Institute of Physics Member Society), is the co-founder and director of the Center for Neutron Science, and served as Chair of the CBE Department from 2007-2012. He was elected to the National Academy of Inventors in 2016 and the National Academy of Engineering in 2015, and is a fellow of both the AAAS and NSSA. In 2018 he was awarded the Sustained Research Award of the Neutron Scattering Society of America. He leads an active research group with focus on the rheology of complex fluids, neutron scattering, colloid and polymer science, applied statistical mechanics, nanotechnology and particle technology. He is also the PI on a midrange infrastructure project funded by the National Science Foundation to build a world-class neutron spin echo instrument at the NIST Center for Neutron Research. Prof. Wagner co-founded STF Technologies LLC in 2003 to commercialize his inventions for applications in personal protective equipment and astronaut protection for NASA, as well as new scientific instruments. More about Professor Wagner, including his three textbooks, many patents and research publications can be found at University of Delaware.

Rheology of Colloidal Glasses and Gels

George Petekidis, Materials Science and Technology, University of Crete and FORTH

Norman J. Wagner, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Delaware

Course Description

Available soon.

Course Outline
  • Colloidal Glasses and Gels & Connection with Microstructure (1.5 hr)
  • Definition of glasses and gels, types of model gelation, equilibrium structure and state/phase diagrams.
  • Linear Rheology of Colloidal Glasses and Gels (1.5 hr)
  • Basics and how moduli and time scales relate to the microstructure. Overview of theoretical models.
  • Nonlinear Rheology of Colloidal Glasses and Gels (1.5 hr)
  • Flow curves, hysteresis, thixotropy, and LAOS.
  • Advanced topics & Applications (1.5 hr)
  • Aging, shape effects, and selected applications in consumer products, food, bio, cement, asphalt.
  • Discussion of Student Questions (30 min)
Instructors
Photo of George Petekidis
George Petekidis

University of Crete and FORTH

George Petekidis received his Bachelor’s degree in Physics from the Aristotelian University of Thessaloniki and a Master’s and PhD degree in polymer physics from the Department of Physics of the University of Crete working on the “Dynamics of Hairy-rod polymers”. He worked at the Department of Physics and Astronomy of the University of Edinburgh with an individual Marie-Curie fellowship with Prof. P.N. Pusey on the “Dynamics of colloidal glasses under shear”. In 2002 he joined FORTH with a return Marie-Curie fellowship and subsequently as an Assistant Researcher. In 2006 he joined the Department of Materials Science and Technology of University of Crete where he is currently a Full Professor. He has served as Head of the Department (2013-2016) and president of the Hellenic Society of Rheology (2014-2017). In 2016 he received the Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel Research Award of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.

His research interests lie in the area of Experimental Soft Condensed Matter. Current work focuses on the dynamics and rheology of metastable colloidal systems such as colloidal glasses and gels, utilizing a combination of experimental tools (rheometry, scattering and microscopy) and computer simulations. More information about his publications and research activity can be found at University of Crete and FORTH.

Photo of Norman J. Wagner
Norman J. Wagner

University of Delaware

Norman J. Wagner is an Alison Professor of the University of Delaware and holds the distinguished Unidel Robert L. Pigford Chair in Chemical Engineering, with affiliated faculty appointments in Physics and Astronomy, Biomechanics and Movement Science, and Biomedical Engineering. He leads an interdisciplinary research team at the University of Delaware. He was President of The Society of Rheology (American Institute of Physics Member Society), is the co-founder and director of the Center for Neutron Science, and served as Chair of the CBE Department from 2007-2012. He was elected to the National Academy of Inventors in 2016 and the National Academy of Engineering in 2015, and is a fellow of both the AAAS and NSSA. In 2018 he was awarded the Sustained Research Award of the Neutron Scattering Society of America. He leads an active research group with focus on the rheology of complex fluids, neutron scattering, colloid and polymer science, applied statistical mechanics, nanotechnology and particle technology. He is also the PI on a midrange infrastructure project funded by the National Science Foundation to build a world-class neutron spin echo instrument at the NIST Center for Neutron Research. Prof. Wagner co-founded STF Technologies LLC in 2003 to commercialize his inventions for applications in personal protective equipment and astronaut protection for NASA, as well as new scientific instruments. More about Professor Wagner, including his three textbooks, many patents and research publications can be found at University of Delaware.

Rheology in Additive Manufacturing

Jonathan Seppala, NIST

Leanne Friedrich, NIST

Course Description

This course will cover the importance of rheology in Additive Manufacturing (AM), with an emphasis on Material Extrusion (ME) techniques including Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM), Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM), Direct Ink Writing (DIW), and Embedded Ink Writing (EIW). It is intended for beginners in rheology and additive manufacturing. The course will provide an introduction to rheological properties, rheological measurement and interpretation of rheological material functions. We will discuss common rheological models used to describe the materials used in ME techniques and how those models can be used to inform material selection and processing routes. The discussion will start with an introduction to thermoplastic extrusion techniques including FDM and BAAM. We will discuss how processing routes are linked to polymer entanglement and crystallization within filaments and across welds. These behaviors vary among common printable thermoplastics including Polylactic Acid, Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene, Polycarbonates, high-performance polymers, and thermoplastic-matrix composites. In-situ process monitoring of thermal gradients and local rheology can be used to inform processing routes. In contrast, ME of thermoset resins and colloidal gels tends to depend more on particle filler rheology than on polymer rheology, and changes in structure are induced post-extrusion. We will describe the range of materials available to DIW and EIW, curing methods, extrusion methods, support strategies, and post-processing routes. The rheology of the ink and support influence defect formation and extrudability. In composite inks and cell-laden inks, the matrix rheology can also influence the efficacy of field-assisted assembly of particles and the survival of cells. In-situ monitoring of fluid flows can be used to understand the influence of rheology on printed structures and to anticipate and correct print defects.

RAM Image 1
RAM Image 2
Course Outline
Part 1. Introduction to rheology and characterization methods
  • What is rheology?
  • Types of deformation and the material response
  • Types of deformation
  • Newtonian (viscous) fluid
  • Elastic solid
  • Viscoelastic fluid
  • Yield stress material
  • Types of tests
  • Steady shear
  • Cone and plate
  • Parallel plate
  • Couette (concentric cylinders)
  • Elongation
  • Capillary rheometry (including Cogswell’s entry flow analysis)
  • Oscillatory shear
  • Dynamic moduli
  • Linear viscoelastic regime
  • Elongation flow
Part 2. Rheology in Material Extrusion (ME) of thermoplastics
  • Process description of bench-top ME (FDM)
  • Comparison to big area additive manufacturing (BAAM)
  • The importance of rheology in AM
  • Polymer physics
  • Modeling
  • Tool paths
  • Weld formation
  • Rheology of polymeric systems
  • Amorphous polymers: polylactic acid (PLA), acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), polycarbonates (PC)
  • Semi-crystalline polymers, polycaprolactone (PC), polypropylene (PP)
  • Flow-induced crystallization
  • High-performance polymers (PEEK, PSU, PEI, etc.)
  • Composites: acrylonitrile butadiene styrene carbon or glass fiber and polylactic acid cellulose nanocrystals (ABS-C/GF, PLA-CNC)
  • In-situ process monitoring in Material Extrusion
  • Temperature
  • Rheology
Part 3. Rheology in Direct Ink Writing (DIW) and Embedded Ink Writing (EIW)
  • What are DIW and EIW? When would you use DIW and EIW as opposed to other techniques?
  • Material systems, curing methods, and post-processing routes
  • To support or not to support, and what kind of support to use
  • Rheology of filled resins, hydrogels, and colloidal inks
  • Power law, Cross, Carreau Yasuda, Herschel-Bulkley, Bingham
  • The importance of rheology and surface tension in thermoset and colloidal inks
  • Form holding: spreading, spanning, pinching, coiling, rupture, and corner defects, and how to control them
  • Extrusion strategies: selecting equipment based on material properties
  • Cell damage in bioprinting: mitigation strategies
  • Field-assisted manipulation of particle fillers
  • Types of fields available: acoustic, magnetic, electric, shear, active mixing
  • Limitations on matrices, particles, positioning, orienting, and hierarchy
  • In-situ process monitoring
  • Computer vision strategies for detecting and correcting defects
  • Computer vision strategies for tracking fluid flows
Instructors
Photo of Leanne Friedrich
Leanne Friedrich

NIST

Leanne Friedrich is a Materials Research Engineer at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Before joining NIST for a National Research Council postdoc, she received her B.S. in Materials Science and Engineering from Northwestern University and her Ph.D. in Materials from the University of California Santa Barbara, where she worked on fabrication of tailored polymer matrix composites using direct ink writing with acoustic focusing. Dr. Friedrich’s current research focuses on embedded ink writing of soft materials. Her research aims to identify how rheology, interfacial energy, and processing parameters influence defect formation during 3D printing of filled resins, hydrogels, and colloidal inks into viscoelastic baths.

Photo of Jonathan Seppala
Jonathan Seppala

NIST

Jonathan Seppala leads the Polymer Additive Manufacturing and Rheology Project, developing multi-modal and in situ measurements that enable control over the complex non-equilibrium material dynamics that characterize soft matter processing. His current research uses infrared thermography, rheology, polarized light, fracture mechanics, and neutron and x-ray reflectivity and scattering to study the polymer physics of thermoplastic additive manufacturing processes. Jonathan earned a B.S. in Chemical Engineering from Michigan Technological University and a Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from Michigan State University studying the rheology and thermodynamics of polymer nanocomposites. Following his Ph.D., Jonathan worked as a Postdoctoral Researcher studying thin film self-assembly of block copolymers and equilibrium dynamics of amphiphilic micelles at the University of Delaware. Before joining the Additive Manufacturing and Rheology Project, Jonathan studied ballistic witness materials and shear thickening fluids as part of NIST's Personal Body Armor Project.